Man Loses 27 Pounds On “Twinkie Diet”

by Randell Allen on January 10, 2011

Randell Allen is a nutritionist and personal trainer in Los Angeles and the creator of NutritionX. NutritonX Los Angeles designs weight loss programs based on your individual body type to help you reach your goal weight.

Mark Haub, a teacher of nutrition at Kansas State University had a theory that moderation is the key to weight loss. So, what did he do?

He went on an 1800 calorie a day diet, which consisted of Twinkies and other junk food, celery stalks, green beans, a protein shake, and a multivitamin for two months.

How did he fair? He lost 27 pounds. Additionally, his triglyceride (high levels are associated with disease) went down 39 points, and his cholesterol levels (high levels are associated with disease), also went down 20 points. Surprisingly, Mark’s HDL cholesterol levels, which are known as the” good cholesterol,” actually went up.

Haub believes fatty and sugary foods are okay to eat, as long as you count calories and document what you are eating.

"I wish I could say it's healthy," he told CNN. "I'm not confident enough in doing that. That frustrates a lot of people. One side says it's irresponsible. It is unhealthy, but the data doesn't say that."

NutritionX Los Angeles Commentary:

Weight Loss reduces disease risk factors

You could visit the offices of every nutritionist across America, and none of them would dare place you on a diet of Twinkies, and expect your health to improve.

However, the big five disease: heart attack, high blood pressure, stroke, type II diabetes, and cancer (the big five) are all correlated with obesity. As your body fat level goes up, your chance for disease increases.

Therefore, just losing weight, no matter how unorthodox, most likely will help you diminish the risk factors associated with avoiding” the big five.”

This is what happened to Mark Haub. He admittedly, confesses to eating a lot before starting his “Twinkie diet.” He lost weight, so his health improved. It is that simple. Most likely, Haub had a high percentage of body fat placing him in or near the obese range (men over 25% body fat and women over 32%).

Don’t trust your bathroom scale

I have had the unfortunate opportunity to be the first person to tell many people that they are classified as obese.

Many times these people are surprised. Many times the people I test do not look “fat.” You actually may not look overweight and still be obese. Taking your body fat percentage is much different than weighing yourself on your home scale. click to learn more about what your body fat percentage means.....

Many clients I work with speak of friends or relatives with heart disease, which they claim are not overweight at all. Again, looks can be deceiving. Chances are their relatives or friends are, at least, on the borderline of obesity.

If you check out my website, you will notice that I offer programs focusing on weight loss, which are for people who have a high percentage of body fat and are attempting to cultivate healthy food and exercise choices that will take them out of the danger zone (25% male-32% female).

I also offer programs focusing on fat loss, which are for those of you attempting to reach a low percentage of body fat, athletes, or people having difficulties with weight loss plateaus.

Your Genetic Potential

Initial weight loss, especially for someone out shape and prone to overeating, is easier than for someone with already a low percentage of body fat, and attempting to reach a even lower body fat percentage.

The first time dieter with poor habits is usually successful for many physiological reasons, which I will not go into due to the fact that it is not the focus of this article.

Look at it like this. If you were to take a “coach potato, ”(someone who does not workout) and you start a severe diet and exercise program, there should be vast improvements in health and performance, because the “couch potato” is so far away from their genetic potential.

Conversely, if you were a world-class sprinter, already pushing the limits of diet and exercise, you may train a rigorous schedule, and still only see small improvements in performance and health. This is because you would be already close to your genetic potential.

In this case, Mark Haub is the coach potato; improvements in health should be expected for someone overeating, overweight, and with average levels of triglycerides, and cholesterol.

It’s all in the numbers

What I give Mark Haub credit for is realizing that what we have discussed in this article is the truth: weight loss will help improve your risk factors, no matter how how unorthodox the method. And, losing weight is about calorie intake.

I don’t think anyone would suggest eating his Twinkie diet long term. Plus, I don’t think you want to eat Twinkies and celery all day, if you are trying to make the Olympic team.

Resources:

C. Tribune (08 November 2010) Nutrition professor sheds 27 pounds on Twinkie diet.

ChicagoTribune.com. Retrieved January 10, 2011.

Madison Park (08 November 2010) “Twinkie diet helps man lose 27 pounds.”

CNN. Retrieved January 10, 2011.

Diabetes, Heart Disease and Stroke: http://diabetes.niddk.nih.gov/dm/pubs/stroke/

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{ 1 comment… read it below or add one }

Ella May 17, 2011 at 9:40 pm

Just wanted to give you a shout from the valley of the sun, great information. Much appreciated.

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